3 COMMENTS

  1. These products look great, but I still am hesitant to buy due to one issue that still plagues photoreal scenery and that is the permanent shadows in the imagery. Obviously the images must be taken when there is zero cloud cover so the intensity of the shadows is going to be amplified. A classic example of this issue is seen in the Orbx screenshots of Barcelona where there is a large oil tank farm. In the image there are hard black shadows from the tanks but in the simulation the sun is coming from the opposite direction casting long soft shadows in the opposite direction. The same is true with the dock cranes. This is confusing to my eye and unfortunately ruins the immersion factor for me personally. This becomes a real problem in mountainous areas as well. Past photoreal developers used to cleverly ensure that the suns direction in the sim matched the direction in the photoreal to hide this still big problem. If tech can ever be developed to solve this issue, I’ll be “in”.

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  2. Hi Thad,

    Great point! I recall Megascenery Earth had an issue with the State of Hawaii. The cloud coverage for some of the areas of the state was so great that you could see the white puffy clouds completely overlaying the scenery. Megascenery earth said they couldn’t sell it as a product and offered the slightly to lightly flawed version for $4.99 -$9.99 United States Dollars for the whole state.
    From what I read Orbx is contracting aircraft to fly over and map the photoscenery. This would take care of alot of problems. Obviously, it will most likely be Visual Flight Rules (V.F.R.) weather conditions. Yet, like you said if you take a detailed and critical look into the shadows there will be native of the lighting conditions when the photographs were taken.

    Dave

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    • Hi David,
      If as you say that Orbx contracts an aircraft to do the photoreal then the best conditions would be to take the imagery when there is a high overcast. This causes diffusion of the light and eliminates hard shadows as the light is unidirectional and colors are uniform. When taking photos for texturing I always go out when it’s overcast to do the shots to eliminate this problem, then the simulator lighting engine can step in and do its work. Currently if it’s cloudy and overcast with these sceneries the hard shadows stay and it looks very strange. If the conditions are right on the other hand, then they look outstanding.
      Cheers

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